Companies Listing on the NYSE Can Appoint an Internal Auditor Within a Year after an IPO

On August 22, 2013, the SEC approved the NYSE’s proposal that permits a company listing in conjunction with an IPO to comply with the internal audit function requirement of Section 303A.07(c) of the NYSE Listed Company Manual within one year of the listing date.  NYSE rules now require such company to have an internal audit function in place no later than the first anniversary of its listing date[1].  Previously, NYSE rules only required each listed company to have an internal audit function but did not provide any transition period for companies listing in connection with an IPO.  

The new one-year transition period for compliance with an internal audit function requirement expanded NYSE corporate governance provisions, to which a transition period applies in connection with an IPO.  Such provisions relate to the composition of the board of directors as well as the composition of the nominating, compensation and audit committees (see Section 303A.00). 

The NYSE believes that a transition period for establishing an internal audit function will make the company’s process of implementation of such function more effective and will reduce the costs it faces in its first year as a public company.  The NYSE also expects that this transition period would enable the company’s audit committee to play a significant role in the design and implementation of the company’s internal audit function. 

In case of a company availing itself of a one-year transition period with respect to its internal audit function, the audit committee must:

  • assist board oversight of the design and implementation of the internal audit function; and
  • meet periodically with the company personnel primarily responsible for the design and implementation of the internal audit function.

Once the company establishes its internal audit function, the audit committee must (i) assist board oversight of the performance of the company’s internal audit function, and (ii) meet periodically with internal auditors or other personnel responsible for the internal audit function.

In addition, if the listed company does not yet have an internal audit function because it is using the internal audit function transition period, the audit committee’s review with the independent auditor of any audit problems should include a discussion of management’s plans with respect to the responsibilities, budget and staffing of the internal audit function and its plans for the implementation of the internal audit function.  Once the transition period is over, the audit committee’s review with the auditors should include a discussion of the responsibilities, budget and staffing of the company’s internal audit function.

The audit committee should also discuss with the board management’s activities with respect to the design and implementation of the internal audit function during the transition period, and after the transition period, the audit committee should review with the full board any issues that arise with respect to the performance of the internal audit function.

 Generally, a listed company must maintain an internal audit function to provide management and the audit committee with ongoing assessments of the company’s risk management processes and system of internal control, and the company can outsource an internal audit function to a third party service provider (other than the company’s independent auditor).   

 

 

 


[1] It is interesting to note that The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (NASDAQ) does not have an internal audit function requirement.  Earlier this year, NASDAQ proposed, and later withdrew, an amendment to its listing requirements that each listed company establish and maintain an internal audit function to provide management and the audit committee with ongoing assessments of the company’s risk management processes and system of internal control.  The SEC received 42 comment letters on the proposal, and NASDAQ stated in its withdrawal that it was withdrawing the proposal to fully consider such comments and that it intends to file a revised proposal (see SEC Release No. 34-69792).

The July 1st Compliance Date for Certain of the New NASDAQ and NYSE Compensation Committee Rules is Around the Corner

On January 11, 2013, the SEC approved proposed changes to the listing standards of the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ Stock Market related to compensation committees. Both exchanges created transition periods to comply with the new rules. We want to remind companies that the following new requirements take effect on July 1, 2013[1]:

Compensation Committee Charter Amendments

NASDAQ and NYSE listed companies will be required to comply with the new rules relating to the authority of a compensation committee to retain compensation consultants, legal counsel, and other compensation advisers; the authority to fund such advisers; and the responsibility of the committee to consider independence factors before selecting, or receiving advice from, such advisers[2].

NASDAQ.  The requirement that such authority and responsibilities of the compensation committee be included in the compensation committee’s written charter does not apply until a later date (see below) for NASDAQ listed companies.  Accordingly, NASDAQ listed companies should consider whether to grant such specific responsibilities and authority by July 1, 2013 through the adoption of a charter, the amendment to an existing charter, or by resolution or other board action. The requirement to adopt a compensation committee charter will not have to be complied with by NASDAQ listed companies until the earlier of their first annual meeting after January 15, 2014, or October 31, 2014.

NYSE NYSE listed companies will have to amend their existing charters by July 1, 2013 to address these additional rights and responsibilities of the compensation committee related to compensation consultants, legal counsel, and other compensation advisers.

Assessing the Independence of Compensation Consultants

The new NASDAQ and NYSE rules provide that the compensation committee may only select, or receive advice from, a compensation consultant, legal counsel, or other compensation adviser after considering the following factors[3]:

  • the provision of other services to the company by the person that employs the adviser;
  • the amount of fees received from the company by the person or firm that employs the adviser, as a percentage of the total revenue of the person or firm that employs the adviser;
  • the policies and procedures of the person or firm that employs the adviser that are designed to prevent conflict of interests;
  • any business or personal relationship of the adviser with a member of the compensation committee;
  • any stock of the company owned by the adviser; and
  • any business or personal relationships between the executive officers of the company and the adviser or the person or firm employing the adviser.

Compensation committees must conduct an independence assessment for all of its advisers, with limited exceptions for in-house counsel and compensation advisers that act in a role limited to (i) consulting on broad-based plans that are generally applicable to all salaried employees, or (ii) providing information that is either not customized for the issuer or that is customized based on parameters that are not developed by the adviser, and about which the adviser does not provide advice.

We note that in evaluating compensation committee adviser independence, the NYSE requires consideration of all factors relevant to an adviser’s independence from management, in addition to the six enumerated factors listed above. NASDAQ does not have a similar catch-all requirement.

Both NASDAQ and NYSE listed companies should assess the independence of their current advisers prior to July 1, 2013.  Ordinarily, this assessment will be performed before a potential adviser is selected and will then be re-assessed on an annual basis.  We would suggest utilizing a compensation committee questionnaire to solict information from the compensation consultant in order to complete this assessment. 

 


[1] The new compensation committee independence requirements do not need to be complied with by NASDAQ or NYSE listed companies until the earlier of their first annual meeting after January 15, 2014, or October 31, 2014. Nevertheless,  NASDAQ and NYSE listed companies should begin preparing to comply with such new independence requirements. 

 

[2] To the extent a NASDAQ listed company does not have a compensation committee by July 1, 2013, this requirement will apply to the independent directors who determine, or recommend for the board’s determination, the compensation of the CEO and other executive officers of the company.

 

[3] To the extent a NASDAQ listed company does not have a compensation committee by July 1, 2013, this requirement will apply to the independent directors who determine, or recommend for the board’s determination, the compensation of the CEO and other executive officers of the company.

 

NYSE Proposes to Move to Only Website Disclosure of Listing Application Materials and to Otherwise Streamline its Listing Application Process

It has been a long-standing practice of the NYSE to post on its website the forms of the documents required to be submitted in connection with the NYSE listing applications. On April 30, 2013, the NYSE filed proposed rule changes to its Listed Company Manual (Manual), which, if adopted, will result in the Manual sections containing the listing application materials being deleted, and updated listing application materials will be posted only on the NYSE’s website. 

Although the NYSE amends its Manual from time to time, forms of listing agreements contained in the Manual have not always been amended to reflect changes made to the NYSE listing documents.  Some provisions in the listing agreements contained in the Manual are obsolete. The NYSE proposes to remove from the Manual (i) each of the agreements set forth in Sections 901.01 through 901.05, (ii) the form of original listing application contained in Section 903.01, and (iii) the form of supplemental listing application contained in Section 903.02. 

In the event that in the future the NYSE makes any substantive changes to those documents that are being removed from the Manual, it will submit a rule filing to the SEC to obtain approval of such changes, except for typographical or stylistic changes. The NYSE also plans to maintain all historical versions of those documents on its website after changes have been made, so that it will be possible to review how each document has changed over time. 

In addition, the NYSE proposes to state certain requirements, which it has been imposing as a matter of practice, in the Manual to add transparency to the listing process.  For example, the NYSE proposes to include in the Manual a new Section 107.00, Financial Disclosure and Other Information Requirements, which will contain the following requirements, among others:

  • Section 107.03 (SEC Compliance): No security shall be approved for listing if the issuer has not for the 12 months immediately preceding the date of listing filed on a timely basis all periodic reports required to be filed with the SEC or Other Regulatory Authority or the security is suspended from trading by the SEC pursuant to Section 12(k) of the Exchange Act.
  •  Section 107.04 (Exchange Information Requests): The NYSE may request any information or documentation, public or non-public, deemed necessary to make a determination regarding a security’s initial listing, including, but not limited to, any material provided to or received from the SEC or Other Regulatory Authority. A company’s security may be denied listing if the company fails to provide such information within a reasonable period of time or if any communication to the NYSE contains a material misrepresentation or omits material information necessary to make the communication to the NYSE not misleading. 

The NYSE also proposes to no longer require the following supporting documents in connection with an original listing application (see Section 702.04):

  •  Stock Distribution Schedule (the stock distribution schedule requirement is obsolete because the NYSE obtains the distribution information it needs from the applicant’s public filings and from its transfer agent). 
  • Certificate of Transfer Agent/Certificate of Registrar (the information that the NYSE needs about the applicant’s outstanding shares is available in its prospectus or periodic SEC reports, as well as the report of the applicant’s outstanding shares that will be required to be delivered to the Exchange once a quarter after listing). 
  • Notice of Availability of Stock Certificates (all transactions in listed securities in the national market system are conducted electronically through DTCC). 
  • Prospectus (final prospectuses are publicly available on the SEC’s website). 
  • Financial Statements (financial statements are included in the applicant’s SEC filings which are publicly available on the SEC’s website).

 

Time Period for SEC Action on Exchanges’ Proposed Compensation Committee Rules Was Extended until January 13, 2013

On September 25, 2012, each of The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC and New York Stock Exchange filed with the SEC proposed rules amending their listing standards for compensation committees.  Generally, under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the SEC should decide whether to approve or disapprove proposed rule changes within 45 days of the publication of notice of the filing of a proposed rule change or within such longer period (up to 90 days) as the SEC may designate.  The 45th day from the publication of notice of filing of the compensation committee proposed rule changes by the exchanges was November 29, 2012. The SEC extended the 45-day time period for SEC action on these proposed rule changes and designated January 13, 2013, as the date by which the SEC should either approve or disapprove these changes.