What Is Good Corporate Governance? A Commonsense Approach

It seems to be a very simple question that does not always produce a clear-cut response. A group of high profile executives, including CEOs of major US corporations, tried to reach consensus on commonsense principles that are “conducive to good corporate governance, healthy public companies and the continued strength of … public markets.” On July 21, 2016, they released Commonsense Principles of Corporate Governance for public companies to promote further conversation on corporate governance.

These principles do not break new ground in corporate governance – it was not the purpose; these principles serve as a compilation of best practices that provide a “basic framework for sound, long-term-oriented governance.” The authors acknowledge that given the differences among public companies “not every principle … will work for every company, and not every principle will be applied in the same fashion by all companies.” These principles should promote discussions at the executive and board levels. They are a must read for board members, C-suite executives and corporate secretaries. Some of these principles can also be used by private companies and large non-profit organizations. Continue reading “What Is Good Corporate Governance? A Commonsense Approach”

Non-GAAP Financial Measures – Agenda Item for Upcoming Audit Committee Meetings

On June 27, 2016, SEC Chair Mary Jo White delivered a speech, which focused, in part, on non-GAAP financial measures, which have become the new old “hot button” issue for the SEC. Chair White strongly urged companies to carefully consider the SEC’s new Compliance & Disclosure Interpretations (“C&DIs”) that were issued in May 2016 and to “revisit their approach to non-GAAP disclosures.” In addition, Chair White emphasized that appropriate controls should be considered and that audit committees should carefully oversee their company’s use of non-GAAP financial measures and disclosures.

The SEC’s mission with respect to non-GAAP financial measures has been the same since its adoption of non-GAAP rules in 2003 — “to eliminate the manipulative or misleading use of non-GAAP financial measures and, at the same time, enhance the comparability associated with the use of that information.” Although the SEC recognizes that “investors want non-GAAP information,” as Chair White mentioned in her speech, the concern is that instead of supplementing the GAAP information, non-GAAP financial measures have “become the key message to investors, crowding out and effectively supplanting the GAAP presentation.” To make her message crystal clear, Chair White also stated in her speech that the SEC is “watching this space very closely and [is] poised to act through the filing review process, enforcement and further rulemaking if necessary to achieve the optimal disclosures for investors and the markets.”

If a company uses non-GAAP financial measures, then the use of such measures and disclosures in the company’s SEC filings, earnings press releases, earnings calls and other presentations should be an agenda item for upcoming audit committee meetings. On June 28, 2016, the Center for Audit Quality issued a new publication, Questions on Non-GAAP Measures: A Tool for Audit Committees, which is designed to facilitate the conversation between audit committees and management about non-GAAP financial measures. Questions included in this publication focus on transparency, consistency, and comparability of non-GAAP financial measures. The publication also includes a few procedural questions that are important to assess whether appropriate controls exist with respect to the use and disclosure of non-GAAP financial measures.