No Rule 506 Offerings for Bad Boys: Felons and Other “Bad Actors”

On July 10, the SEC revamped the way private placements under Rule 506 of Regulation D can be conducted by permitting general solicitation and general advertising in offerings where all purchasers are accredited investors (see To Use or Not to Use General Solicitation and General Advertising in Private Placements?) and by disqualifying felons and other “bad actors” from all Rule 506 offerings (i.e., irrespective of whether the offering involves or does not involve general solicitation and general advertising).  New SEC “bad actor” rules, effective 60 days after publication in the Federal Register, implement Section 926 of the Dodd-Frank Act and were originally proposed two years ago (May 25, 2011).

Under new Rule 506(d), “Bad Actor” Disqualification, an issuer will not be able to rely on the Rule 506 exemption from registration under the Securities Act of 1933 if the issuer or any other “covered person” is or was involved in a disqualifying event.

Covered Persons

“Covered persons” under Rule 506(d) include:

  • the issuer, any predecessor of the issuer, or any affiliated issuer;
  • directors, executive officers, other officers participating in the offering, general partners or managing members of the issuer;
  • beneficial owners of 20% or more of the issuer’s outstanding voting equity securities, calculated on the basis of voting power;
  • promoters connected with the company at the time of such sale;
  • investment managers of a pooled investment fund;
  • persons compensated (directly or indirectly) for soliciting investors; and
  • directors, executive officers, or other officers participating in the offering, of any such investment manager or solicitor or general partner or managing member of such investment manager or solicitor.

Disqualifying Events

Rule 506(d) “disqualifying events” include the following:

  • criminal convictions, within ten years before the sale of securities (or five years, in the case of issuers, their predecessors and affiliated issuers) in connection with the purchase or sale of any security; involving the making of any false filing with the SEC; or arising out of the conduct of an underwriter, broker, dealer, or other financial intermediary;
  • court injunctions and restraining orders, entered within five years before such sale, in connection with the purchase or sale of any security; involving the making of any false filing with the SEC; or arising out of the conduct of an underwriter, broker, dealer, or other financial intermediary;
  • final orders of a state securities commission; a state authority that supervises or examines banks, savings associations, or credit unions; a state insurance commission; an appropriate federal banking agency; the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission; or the National Credit Union Administration that: 

     (i)  bar the person from associating with a regulated entity; engaging in the business of  securities, insurance or banking; or engaging in savings association or credit union activities; or

     (ii)  are based on a violation of any law or regulation that prohibits fraudulent, manipulative, or deceptive conduct entered within ten years before such sale;

  • SEC disciplinary orders suspending or revoking a person’s registration as a broker, dealer, municipal securities dealer or investment adviser; placing limitations on the activities of such person; or barring such person from being associated with any entity or from participating in the offering of any penny stock;
  • SEC cease and desist orders, entered within five years before such sale, that, orders the person to cease and desist from committing or causing a violation of any scienter-based anti-fraud provision of the federal securities laws (e.g., Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5 or Section 5 of the Securities Act of 1933).
  • suspensions or expulsions from membership in, or suspension or a bar from association with a member of, a registered national securities exchange for any act or omission to act constituting conduct inconsistent with just and equitable principles of trade;
  • SEC stop orders in connection with a registration statement or orders suspending the Regulation A exemption, issued within five years before such sale; or investigation to determine whether a stop order or suspension order should be issued; or
  • U.S. Postal Service false representation orders, entered within five years before such sale, or being subject to a temporary restraining order or preliminary injunction with respect to conduct alleged by the U. S. Postal Service to constitute a scheme or device for obtaining money or property through the mail by means of false representations.

Exceptions

Rule 506(d) disqualification does not apply if:

  • the triggering event occurred before the effective date of the new rules;
  • the SEC waives the disqualification;
  • before the relevant sale, the court or regulatory authority that entered the relevant order, judgment or decree advises in writing that Rule 506(d) disqualification should not arise as a consequence of such order, judgment or decree; or
  • the company establishes that it did not know and, in the exercise of reasonable care, could not have known that a disqualification existed.

 Disclosure of Pre-Existing Disqualifying Events

The company must furnish to each purchaser, a reasonable time prior to sale, a description in writing of any matters that would have triggered Rule 506(d) disqualification but occurred before the effective date of new rules.  The failure to furnish such information timely will not prevent a company from relying on Rule 506 exemption from registration if the company establishes that it did not know and, in the exercise of reasonable care, could not have known of the existence of the undisclosed matter or matters.

Reasonable Care

In connection with “reasonable care” requirements, a company will not be able to establish that it has exercised reasonable care unless it has made a factual inquiry into whether any disqualifications exist. The nature and scope of the factual inquiry will vary based on the facts and circumstances concerning, among other things, the company and the other offering participants.  For example, the SEC anticipates companies to have “an in-depth knowledge of their own executive officers and other officers participating in securities offerings gained through the hiring process and in the course of the employment relationship, and in such circumstances, further steps may not be required in connection with a particular offering.”

The SEC suggested that “factual inquiry by means of questionnaires or certifications, perhaps accompanied by contractual representations, covenants and undertakings, may be sufficient in some circumstances, particularly if there is no information or other indicators suggesting bad actor involvement.”  The SEC also clarified that for continuous, delayed or long-lived offerings, “reasonable care includes updating the factual inquiry on a reasonable basis,” which can be “managed through contractual covenants from covered persons to provide bring-down of representations, questionnaires and certifications, negative consent letters, periodic re-checking of public databases, and other steps, depending on the circumstances.”

Companies that are contemplating a Rule 506 private placement need to establish internal procedures for conducting a factual inquiry into whether “bad actors” may be involved in its offering.

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