NASDAQ Has Proposed Changes to Its Compensation Committee Rules. What Should We Do Now?

If you work for a Nasdaq-listed company, you should pay close attention to Nasdaq’s proposal related to compensation committees rules.  The proposal was issued last week in response to the SEC’s Rule 10C-1 and Section 952 of the Dodd-Frank Act that required the SEC to direct the national securities exchanges to prohibit the listing of any equity security of an issuer, subject to certain exemptions, that does not comply with the Act’s requirements relating to compensation committees and compensation advisers. 

 Summary of Nasdaq’s Proposal

 Generally, Nasdaq has proposed the following changes to its compensation committee rules:

  •  companies must have a compensation committee consisting of at least two members, each of whom must be an independent director as defined in Nasdaq’s current listing rules;
  • compensation committee members must not accept directly or indirectly any consulting, advisory or other compensatory fee, other than for board service, from a company or any subsidiary thereof;
  • in determining whether a director is eligible to serve on a compensation committee, a company’s board of directors must consider whether the director is affiliated with the company, a subsidiary of the company or an affiliate of a subsidiary of the company; and
  •  companies must adopt a formal, written compensation committee charter that must specify, among other matters, the compensation committee responsibilities and authority as set forth in Rule 10C-1 relating to the: (i) authority to retain compensation consultants, independent legal counsel and other compensation advisers; (ii) authority to fund such advisers; and (iii) responsibility to consider certain independence factors before selecting such advisers, other than in-house legal counsel.

 Effective Dates

 Proposed Nasdaq Listing Rule 5605(d)(3), which requires compensation committees to have the specific responsibilities and authority relating to compensation consultants, independent legal counsel and other compensation advisers, will be effective immediately upon the SEC’s approval of the Nasdaq’s proposal. 

 Nasdaq-listed companies must comply with the remaining amended listing rules described aboveby the earlier of: (1) their second annual meeting held after the date of approval of the proposed rules; or (2) December 31, 2014.  A company must certify to Nasdaq, no later than 30 days after the implementation deadline applicable to it, that it complied with the amended listing rules on compensation committees (Nasdaq will provide a form for this certification).

 What Should We Do Now?

 Please see below a list of suggested action items in connection with such proposals:

  1.  If you do not have a compensation committee and a majority of independent directors is making, or recommending to the board, compensation decisions related to executive officers of the company, start evaluating potential candidates for compensation committee membership.
  2. If you have a compensation committee consisting of one director, start evaluating potential candidates to expand the compensation committee to two members, as suggested by the SEC, or even to three members in order to avoid giving each director a veto power.
  3. Consider whether existing members of the compensation committee or potential members of the compensation committee are getting any compensatory fees from the company or any of its subsidiaries or are affiliated with the company or a subsidiary of the company or an affiliate of a subsidiary of the company.  Evaluate whether any changes to the current composition of the compensation committee are necessary.
  4. Implement new responsibilities and authority applicable to compensation committees, or independent directors involved in compensation decisions, relating to: (i) authority to retain compensation consultants, independent legal counsel and other compensation advisers; (ii) authority to fund such advisers; and (iii) responsibility to consider certain independence factors before selecting such advisers through a charter amendment or board resolution.
  5. Draft a new, or revise an existing, compensation committee charter.

 

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